What Is a Bright City?

A Bright City works to lessen the harm of neurotoxic chemicals in ways that are tailored for each community.

Example actions include restricting the use of toxic pesticides on lawns, parks and pets, implementing integrated pest management in public buildings and housing, replacing lead painted windows or requiring training for landlords about lead abatement.

Example actions may include increasing screening of blood lead levels in pregnant women and infants or bolstering policies to reduce exposures to mercury and PCBs in locally caught fish and shellfish.

Example actions include reducing emissions through no-idle policies, requiring diesel engine retrofits in high traffic areas or reducing emissions from wood stoves, including the requirement of EPA certified models.

Example actions include reducing lead, arsenic and perchlorate levels in drinking water or replacing lead service lines in water distribution systems.

Example actions include avoiding the purchase of products containing mercury, flame retardants, pesticides, phthalates, lead and arsenic; and setting performance measures to track reductions in exposures to these chemicals.

Example actions include helping child care facilities avoiding purchasing products containing mercury, flame retardants, pesticides, phthalates, lead and arsenic; and setting performance measures to track reductions in exposures to these chemicals.

Example actions include testing soil in community gardens and playgrounds and remediating as needed; promoting breastfeeding; and increasing access to food grown without harmful pesticides.

Example actions include conducting city-wide audits to identify sources of neurotoxic chemical exposure and hot spots along with improving communications to at-risk populations.

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Bright Cities Anchorage Slider

Case Study: How Being a Bright City Can Lead to Healthier Kids in Your Community

Anchorage recently trained childcare providers on what to look for in household products to avoid harmful ingredients. The training focused on children’s nap mats. City employees collected mats potentially containing chemical flame retardants and exchanged them for healthier alternatives. The toxics training and nap mat change-out were developed in collaboration with Bright Cities.
Meet Providence

Meet Providence, Rhode Island

One of the oldest cities in the U.S., Providence is also the capital and most populous city in Rhode Island. Grand historic buildings populate a thriving downtown and many delicious restaurants and cafes are within easy walking distance of City Hall (built 1878). Providence also shares Rhode Island’s affinity for coffee and boasts the most coffee and doughnut shops per capita of any city in the country.
Case Study: How Being a Bright City Can Lead to  Even More Wins for Your Community

Case Study: How Being a Bright City Can Lead to Even More Wins for Your Community

Salt Lake City (SLC) recently won a $5,000 grant from Stonyfield Organic to be used towards organic turf management. SLC began taking steps towards organic landscaping over a year ago through Pesticide Free SLC — a project that helped to establish its commitment to organic lawn care long before the Stonyfield grant. Pesticide Free SLC is a pilot project developed in collaboration with SLC’s Bright Cities partnership.