What Is a Bright City?

A Bright City works to lessen the harm of neurotoxic chemicals in ways that are tailored for each community.

Example actions include restricting the use of toxic pesticides on lawns, parks and pets, implementing integrated pest management in public buildings and housing, replacing lead painted windows or requiring training for landlords about lead abatement.

Example actions may include increasing screening of blood lead levels in pregnant women and infants or bolstering policies to reduce exposures to mercury and PCBs in locally caught fish and shellfish.

Example actions include reducing emissions through no-idle policies, requiring diesel engine retrofits in high traffic areas or reducing emissions from wood stoves, including the requirement of EPA certified models.

Example actions include reducing lead, arsenic and perchlorate levels in drinking water or replacing lead service lines in water distribution systems.

Example actions include avoiding the purchase of products containing mercury, flame retardants, pesticides, phthalates, lead and arsenic; and setting performance measures to track reductions in exposures to these chemicals.

Example actions include helping child care facilities avoiding purchasing products containing mercury, flame retardants, pesticides, phthalates, lead and arsenic; and setting performance measures to track reductions in exposures to these chemicals.

Example actions include testing soil in community gardens and playgrounds and remediating as needed; promoting breastfeeding; and increasing access to food grown without harmful pesticides.

Example actions include conducting city-wide audits to identify sources of neurotoxic chemical exposure and hot spots along with improving communications to at-risk populations.

Blog

Two people holding a baby and a bucket of toxic-free supplies at SDEV event in Dearborn Michigan

How City Governments can Partner for Success

"Dearborn applauds Southwest Detroit Environmental Vision’s work to help residents learn about and reduce exposure to toxic chemicals that harm babies’ brains,” said David Norwood, Director of Sustainability in Dearborn, Michigan.
Photo of woman lifting happy child during daytime

City Governments Can Help Protect Your Babies’ Brain Development

Cities have incredible untapped assets and political strengths. Around the country, mayors are taking the lead on pressing social issues—climate change, infrastructure, economic revitalization, health care, and more.
Healthy Living Through Toxic-Free Food in Columbia, South Carolina

Healthy Living Through Toxic-Free Food in Columbia, South Carolina

"When is the next event going to be held!?" We answered this question numerous times during Columbia, South Carolina's, Bright Cities-sponsored community events.